Da Bears Blog | Bears Fall to Lions at Home, Now 3-7: Quarter-By-Quarter Analysis

Quarter One

  • Fields is an athletic mismatch for every defense he faces. On the opening drive he simply ran around the Lions defense. When that athleticism is paired with a serious passing attack, the Bears are going to have one of the best offenses in the league. And there’s no reason to believe that isn’t possible for September 2023.
  • The Bears now have a pretty horrible defense, and it all starts up front. This defensive line is blown off the ball weekly.
  • The story of the quarter for the Bears offense was two penalties. A bad call on Braxton Jones derailed the opening drive and a 50/50 facemask on Cole Kmet put the Bears behind the chains. When calls like these get made, I always ask the same question: who wants the game called this way? How does this increase the entertainment value of the sport?

Quarter Two

  • Already in this game, Nick Morrow, Jack Sanborn and Joe Thomas are making plays. They don’t completely account for the loss of Roquan Smith, but they are showing – quite vividly – ​​that spending $100 million at the position is not necessary.
  • Bears well aware they have nobody to rush the passer and are selling out on blitzes. When they haven’t batted down the Goff pass, they’ve been burned. The number of wide-open receivers on these plays is jarring but expected.
  • Bears could easily have Fields drop back and throw every down, but they need to possess the ball for as long as possible. Their defense can’t stop anyone. They’ve got to stay on the field offensively as long as possible.
  • What a play by Aidan Hutchinson on David Montgomery at the goal line. He looked like Jake “The Snake” Roberts.

Overall, I’m not sure I have watched a first half with less to write about.


Quarter Three

  • Armon Watts looks like a player that can be part of a rotation in the future. He’s not a top player at defensive tackle, but he’s someone with value.
  • Love seeing Fields sit in a clean pocket and show patience. Just because he can run doesn’t mean he should run. And he’s learning that at a remarkable pace.
  • Dannehy and I have been lone wolves in our support of Cole Kmet but now, in a functional offense, fans are seeing what he brings. The arrow is pointed decidedly up for Kmet with this quarterback. This is the most important quarter of his professional career.

Quarter Four

  • Three and out for the Bears on what looked like certain pass interference on Kmet. Somehow this flag-happy crew doesn’t call that?
  • Jack Sanborn can play inside backer at this level and the drop-off from Roquan does not seem as significant as many believed. Bears dodged a bullet when Roquan turned down their huge offer this summer. He should have an interception and multiple sacks in this game, but the referees have decided to call phantom penalties on every series.
  • Terrible throw by Fields on the pick six. That’s a play he needs to let go. Punting the football is not always a bad thing.
  • And then Fields runs 67 yards for a touchdown. There is no accounting for a quarterback that can simply run through an entire defense. And Fields is doing that weekly.
  • Jaylon Johnson getting beat by Tom Kennedy in the fourth quarter is the icing on a bad cake day for the corner. Not sure if it is health related or not, but this is one of the worst games Johnson has played in Chicago.
  • 2:17 to go and the Bears need a field goal. Here’s the play-by-play.
    • Fields keeps off right edge for five. The issue with running the ball on that first down is that you essentially commit to burning the two-minute warning. Bears now have two minutes and three timeouts.
    • Fields with a bad sideline toss to Claypool. Could have been intercepted. Third and fifth.
    • Fields dances in the pocket and floats a beauty to Montgomery. Almost caught. Holding defense. First down.
    • Fields throws to Kmet, but Kmet gets knee-knocked to the ground.
    • Sack, dump off, sack. Bears lost.

Summary

Justin Fields had another stellar day and is looking every bit the part of a franchise quarterback. That’s all that matters.

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